Inessential tasks

First a rather complex question: Will a machine or a robot be creative, imaginative and original and make interesting artworks in the near future?

Currently there are many predictions around this developing topic about the expansion of creativity and machine learning. For the sake of argument, let’s pass by my doubts here and assume the robot becomes a technartist.

The next question will be: Could that technartist have its own artist statement?

The answer is definitely Yes, as I came across a software based artist statement generator by Jasper Rigole, which could be easily used for the purpose. I love Jasper’s introduction letter too, from which I respectfully borrow some words for the title of this blogpost.

 

Here you can see what my artist statement would look like when I used the generator:

with the input: Conceptual / Media Art / Installation Art / Film + Movement + Situation + Strategy

 

Robin (°1964, Amsterdam, Netherlands) makes conceptual artworks, media art, installations and films. By questioning the concept of movement, Robin wants the viewer to become part of the art as a kind of added component. Art is entertainment: to be able to touch the work, as well as to interact with the work is important.

His conceptual artworks are made through strict rules which can be perceived as liberating constraints. Romantic values such as ‘inspiration’, ‘genius’ and ‘authenticity’ are thereby neutralised and put into perspective. By applying a wide variety of contemporary strategies, he finds that movement reveals an inherent awkwardness, a humour that echoes our own vulnerabilities. The artist also considers movement as a metaphor for the ever-seeking man who experiences a continuous loss.

His works are based on inspiring situations: visions that reflect a sensation of indisputability and serene contemplation, combined with subtle details of odd or eccentric, humoristic elements. By creating situations and breaking the passivity of the spectator, he plays with the idea of the mortality of an artwork confronted with the power of a transitory appearance, which is, by being restricted in time, much more intense.

His works isolate the movements of humans and/or objects. By doing so, new sequences are created which reveal an inseparable relationship between motion and sound. Robin currently lives and works in The Netherlands.

 

Firstly, I need to remark how rather convincing and really interesting the outcome is. Great to see what language software can do these days. Secondly, one can use the software also in a reverse way and use it to find how you can optimise your artist statement. Would a technartist grasp this hack too, I wonder?

 

With some human finesse added and using some more generator results, I came very efficient to this well-reviewed artist statement:

Robin (°1964, Amsterdam, Netherlands) makes conceptual artworks, media art, installations and films. By questioning the concept of movement, Robin wants the viewer to become part of the art as a kind of added component. Art is interactive play: to be able to touch the work, as well as to interact with the work is important.

By applying a wide variety of contemporary strategies, he finds that movement reveals an inherent awkwardness, a humour that echoes our own vulnerabilities. The artist also considers movement as a metaphor for the ever-seeking man who experiences a continuous loss.

Robin often creates work using creative game tactics, but these are never permissive. Play is a serous matter: during the game, different rules apply than in everyday life and even everyday objects undergo profound transformations.

His installations directly respond to the surrounding environment and uses everyday experiences from the artist as a starting point. Often these are framed instances that would go unnoticed in their original context. With a conceptual approach, he tries to increase the dynamic between audience and author by objectifying emotions and investigating the duality that develops through different interpretations.

By applying a poetic and often metaphorical language, he wants to amplify the astonishment of the spectator by creating compositions or settings that generate tranquil poetic images that leave traces and balances on the edge of recognition and alienation.

His works are based on inspiring situations: visions that reflect a sensation of indisputability and serene contemplation, combined with subtle details of odd or eccentric, humoristic elements. By creating situations and breaking the passivity of the spectator, he plays with the idea of the mortality of an artwork confronted with the power of a transitory appearance, which is, by being restricted in time, much more intense.

Robin currently lives and works in The Netherlands.